Garamond face on the monotype machine.
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Garamond face on the monotype machine. by Stanley Morison

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Published by Lanston Monotype Corporation in London .
Written in English


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Edition Notes

Cover title.

ContributionsLanston Monotype Corporation.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19841947M

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Monotype Drawing Office This typeface is based on roman types cut by Jean Jannon in Jannon followed the designs of Claude Garamond which had been cut in the previous century. Garamond's types were, in turn, based on those used by Aldus Manutius . The design of the roman is based on types by Claude Garamond (c. –), particularly a specimen printed by the Frankfurt printer Konrad Berner. Berner had married the widow of a fellow printer Jacques Sabon, the source of the face's name, who had bought some of Category: Serif. The first was designed for use on Linotype and Monotype machines, and the second for Stempel hand composition. Because the Stempel version does not have the constraints necessary for types intended for machine composition, it seems closer to a pure interpretation of its Garamond ancestor.   Garamond is a classic, elegant old-style serif typeface that originated in the designs of French punch-cutter Claude Garamond (–). Garamond’s designs were further embellished in .

  He taught these materials in Community & Business Colleges for 20 years or so. He started designing fonts in , and now has over a hundred fonts for sale at and Monotype’s various sites. His personal best selling book is either “Practical font Design” or “Writing In InDesign”. He doesn’t keep track of stuff like that. Monotype Metal Type Faces Based on information in the Specimen Book of 'Monotype' Printing Types, c published by The Monotype Corporation, mented by information in earlier specimen sheets, in various editions of Monotype's Book of Information, and lists held by the Type Archive, London.A few faces listed below in italics are U.S. Lanston Monotype faces, but were . The growing popularity of grotesque typefaces meant that many new sans serif analogues were published in the early 20th century. Setting machines were not compatible with each other but all foundries wanted to offer up-to-date fonts, and as a result numerous different typeface families appeared that seem almost identical at first glance and yet go their separate ways with regard to details. The first typefaces would be historical revivals: modern interpretations of classic designs like Bembo, Garamond, Baskerville and Fournier, developed for machine composition. The next stage of Morison’s plan was the development of new, original designs, starting with a book face patterned after epigraphic, rather than calligraphic, letters.

Garamond is Michelangelo's David to the type world. It is a timeless masterpiece created by a classical craftsman and to this day is a cherished piece of history. Even in today's digital forms, Garamond evokes the hand. It puckers and bloats in delicate ways like ink swelling within paper fibers. Buy ITC Garamond Book Family desktop font from ITC on Garamond in use. Many revivals bearing Claude Garamond’s name have been released by various foundries (many of them actually being based on the work of Jean Jannon, and italics by Robert Granjon). Uses are tagged with this generic entry unless a . Monotype Drawing Office This typeface is based on roman types cut by Jean Jannon in Jannon followed the designs of Claude Garamond which had been cut in the previous century. Garamond's types were, in turn, based on those used by Aldus .